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About: 20 ans, je parle français/hablo español/I speak English

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la-vaniteuse:

colour sketching dump

(via draggedqueens)

slavocracy:

sorry white people but if you dont support mike brown & the people of fergusons’ protests in 2014 you probably wouldnt have supported abolition in the 1800s or civil rights movements in the 1960s & having the ability to recognize something as morally justified in hindsight something that has already been accepted by the mainstream as morally justified is nice for u but on all practical levels useless to everyone else 

(Source : cabbagefuneral, via amirkhadir)

(Source : natsunohana, via emoqueen420)

(Source : hanecdote, via liftmyworldoffme)

katorra:

Amazing Avatar Scenes [4/?]

This scene brings out both the actor and the director in, just because it is so well done.

Let’s put this into context.

Korra has just recently found out that she is part spirit and after holding off Unalaq for as long as she could Unalaq has released Vaatu and fused with him creating a DARK avatar, a being as strong and powerful as Korra, except as a force of evil.

That brand new dark avatar has beaten Korra down and literally ripped Korra and Raava apart. Now, Unalaq is beating the poor helpless spirit and destroying every connection Korra has with her past lives. Every single strike Unalaq takes at Raava, Korra feels one of her past lives die.

We all watched and loved Avatar: The Last Airbender, so we grew to love the past avatars and of course AANG. So, seeing each one of their spiritual forms being destroyed was so incredibly terrifying and heartbreaking.

Unalaq is killing the very thing that makes her who she is.

Despite the fact that Unalaq is actually killing parts of Korra, one-by one, she still tries to fight, even though each blow is so painful that she keels over and feels herself being wrenched apart.

It is such a dark scene, but it is so important.

All of that is not even taking into consideration the amazing animation and directing of the scene, the beautiful display of colors we see with Harmonic Convergence in the background. And of course, Janet Varney’s kick-ass voice-acted yelps of pain as Raava is struck. But most of all, the score. The music is so beautifully done in this scene and it really compliments the scene so well.

I know as a member of the fandom that this scene was really hard to watch, but I just think that it needs to be given the credit it deserves. This scene was incredible.

(Source : cloudbending, via i-am-avatar-korra)

thequeerclone:

the fact that there have been no leaked nudes in my dashboard proves that i’m following the right people

(via eltonjonathantaylorthomas)

urgetocreate:

Harold Harvey, Pioneers of Aerial Navigation, 1912

urgetocreate:

Harold Harvey, Pioneers of Aerial Navigation, 1912

(via silencebetweensentences)

+

(Source : useyourmelody, via fr33kinmatt)

queerbot23:

I was tagged by mouthspiders :)
Cujo by Stephen King (i sobbed for like 2 hours… the ducks, mommy…. the ducks…)
Shanghai Girls by Lisa See (very depressing. it took me a long time to get through it but it was good… very insightful)
Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J. K. Rowling
The Time Machine by H. G. Wells
 A Game of Thrones by G. R. R. Martin
The Green Mile by Stephen King (i rly like books that make me cry)
The Heaven Makers by Frank Herbert (tbh I didn’t even like that book v much but it stuck with me nonetheless)
The Black Stallion by Walter Farley (my favorite book when I was a kid)
The Two Towers by J. R. R. Tolkien
The Outsiders by S. E. Hinton
I hereby tag becka-brick, nickthinksthings, skapunkrock, seafoam-and-stardust, vulcan-spectre, ilmaimait, perseusjacksoff, lordsmellymort, kinseycoatedfury, and daethlyhallows

queerbot23 Hey I’m doing this.
1. A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest Gaines: I literally talk about this book every day and I hope everyone reads it. This book makes me cry every time I read it and it just keeps getting better and more relevant to my life.
2. Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston: Another book that makes me cry and gets more relevant with each reading. A beautiful tale and study of linguistics, but more importantly, an empowering tale.
3. London Triptych by Jonathan Kemp: An awesome book about gay men’s struggles told through the lives of three men in London, which really helped me through some toxic issues I had.
4. La femme aux pieds nus by Scholastique Mukasonga: A powerful book about genocide that is as haunting as it is beautiful.
5. Une si longue lettre by Mariama Bâ: This story of a woman’s struggle to live in a polygamous world while maintaining her identity and independence is heartbreaking and moving, but ultimately inspiring.
6. Le coeur à rire et à pleurer by Maryse Condé: An autobiography of a woman’s self-discovery, I found this book to be inspiring and moving and overwhelmingly sad.
7. Daughter of Ireland by Juliene Osborne-McKnight: This book opened my eyes to the richness of Ireland and her culture, both ancient and modern. This book helped me discover my roots and what it means to be Irish.
8. A Song of Ice and Fire by George R. R. Martin: simply for it’s sheer size and depth, this series is impressive, not to mention it’s intriguing story lines and amazing writing.
9. Conversational Cajun French I by Randall P. Whatley and Harry Jannise: This basically large pamphlet (unfortunately tbh) of Cajun French is at the same time informative and intriguing. While only a cursory glance at the richness of the Cajun dialect of French, this book opened my eyes to the beauty and richness of dialects outside of Paris.
10. The Other Boleyn Girl by Philippa Gregory: Call me clichéd all you want, but this book holds a special place in my heart, not only because it introduced a FANTASTIC writer of history and historical-fiction, but also because I read this book (for the first time) when I went to New Orleans with my best friend (for the first time), and met her grandma-figure (for the second time), and talked openly about being not straight with an adult figure (for the first time).
I’m not going to tag anyone specifically b/c I know it took me forever to find time to do this, but if you decide to do it, tag me so I can see it!

queerbot23:

I was tagged by mouthspiders :)

  1. Cujo by Stephen King (i sobbed for like 2 hours… the ducks, mommy…. the ducks…)
  2. Shanghai Girls by Lisa See (very depressing. it took me a long time to get through it but it was good… very insightful)
  3. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J. K. Rowling
  4. The Time Machine by H. G. Wells
  5.  A Game of Thrones by G. R. R. Martin
  6. The Green Mile by Stephen King (i rly like books that make me cry)
  7. The Heaven Makers by Frank Herbert (tbh I didn’t even like that book v much but it stuck with me nonetheless)
  8. The Black Stallion by Walter Farley (my favorite book when I was a kid)
  9. The Two Towers by J. R. R. Tolkien
  10. The Outsiders by S. E. Hinton

I hereby tag becka-brick, nickthinksthings, skapunkrock, seafoam-and-stardust, vulcan-spectre, ilmaimait, perseusjacksoff, lordsmellymort, kinseycoatedfury, and daethlyhallows

queerbot23 Hey I’m doing this.

1. A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest Gaines: I literally talk about this book every day and I hope everyone reads it. This book makes me cry every time I read it and it just keeps getting better and more relevant to my life.

2. Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston: Another book that makes me cry and gets more relevant with each reading. A beautiful tale and study of linguistics, but more importantly, an empowering tale.

3. London Triptych by Jonathan Kemp: An awesome book about gay men’s struggles told through the lives of three men in London, which really helped me through some toxic issues I had.

4. La femme aux pieds nus by Scholastique Mukasonga: A powerful book about genocide that is as haunting as it is beautiful.

5. Une si longue lettre by Mariama Bâ: This story of a woman’s struggle to live in a polygamous world while maintaining her identity and independence is heartbreaking and moving, but ultimately inspiring.

6. Le coeur à rire et à pleurer by Maryse Condé: An autobiography of a woman’s self-discovery, I found this book to be inspiring and moving and overwhelmingly sad.

7. Daughter of Ireland by Juliene Osborne-McKnight: This book opened my eyes to the richness of Ireland and her culture, both ancient and modern. This book helped me discover my roots and what it means to be Irish.

8. A Song of Ice and Fire by George R. R. Martin: simply for it’s sheer size and depth, this series is impressive, not to mention it’s intriguing story lines and amazing writing.

9. Conversational Cajun French I by Randall P. Whatley and Harry Jannise: This basically large pamphlet (unfortunately tbh) of Cajun French is at the same time informative and intriguing. While only a cursory glance at the richness of the Cajun dialect of French, this book opened my eyes to the beauty and richness of dialects outside of Paris.

10. The Other Boleyn Girl by Philippa Gregory: Call me clichéd all you want, but this book holds a special place in my heart, not only because it introduced a FANTASTIC writer of history and historical-fiction, but also because I read this book (for the first time) when I went to New Orleans with my best friend (for the first time), and met her grandma-figure (for the second time), and talked openly about being not straight with an adult figure (for the first time).

I’m not going to tag anyone specifically b/c I know it took me forever to find time to do this, but if you decide to do it, tag me so I can see it!

(Source : mouthspiders)

(Source : sansabird, via aileysworld)

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